What was the significance of interchangeable parts

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what was the significance of interchangeable parts

Interchangeable Parts: Acting, Industry, and Technology in US Theater by Victor Holtcamp

While Hollywood has long been called “The Dream Factory,” and theatrical entertainment more broadly has been called “The Industry,” the significance of these names has rarely been explored. There are in fact striking overlaps between industrial rhetoric and practice and the development of theatrical and cinematic techniques for rehearsal and performance. Interchangeable Parts examines the history of acting pedagogy and performance practice in the United States, and their debts to industrial organization and philosophy. Ranging from the late nineteenth century through the end of the twentieth, the book recontextualizes the history of theatrical technique in light of the embrace of industrialization in US culture and society.
 
Victor Holtcamp explores the invocations of scientific and industrial rhetoric and philosophy in the founding of the first schools of acting, and echoes of that rhetoric in playwriting, production, and the cinema, as Hollywood in particular embraced this industrially infected model of acting.  In their divergent approaches to performance, the major US acting teachers (Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler, and Sanford Meisner) demonstrated strong rhetorical affinities for the language of industry, illustrating the pervasive presence of these industrial roots. The book narrates the story of how actors learned to learn to act, and what that process, for both stage and screen, owed to the interchangeable parts and mass production revolutions.  
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Interchangeable Parts

Interchangeable parts are parts components that are, for practical purposes, identical. They are made to specifications that ensure that they are so nearly identical that they will fit into any assembly of the same type.
Victor Holtcamp

230 Years of Interchangeable Parts – A Brief History

The Industrial Revolution radically changed every aspect of daily life, and exploded the average income and population to exponential rates. Two of the forefathers of the Industrial Revolution include: Eli Whitney, the inventor of the Cotton Gin and the concept of interchangeable parts, and Henry Ford, the late great automobile pioneer who created the first continuous moving assembly line. In fact, these two pioneers changed the way manufacturing was conducted in the past to the formidable economic force of today. Interchangeable parts made manufacturing a faster process, whereby identical parts from a master design were used to create an unlimited number of replicas. This revolutionized the handcrafted production humanity was accustomed to since the dawn of civilization. The assembly line allowed for the sequential manufacturing of certain products in a continuous fashion. The Industrial Revolution would have never succeeded without these core concepts to fuel trade and essentially explode economic growth world-wide.

Click here for audio of Episode Today, a brilliant invention is forgotten. The University of Houston's College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. M anufacturing with machine-made, interchangeable parts isn't the same as the modern assembly line. Interchangeability had to be well developed before we could begin mass-producing goods. The idea of interchangeability goes back to Gutenberg's invention of precision type.

Preindustrial Gunmaking

Interchangeable parts , identical components that can be substituted one for another, particularly important in the history of manufacturing. Mass production , which transformed the organization of work, came about by the development of the machine-tool industry by a series of 19th-century innovators. With precision equipment, large numbers of identical parts could be produced at low cost and with a small workforce.

They are made to specifications that ensure that they are so nearly identical that they will fit into any assembly of the same type. Examples of interchangeable parts in the following topics: Manufacturing The "American System" was the first to successfully implement the use of interchangeable parts in industry. The "American System" featured semi-skilled labor using machine tools and jigs to make standardized, identical, interchangeable parts , which could be assembled with a minimum of time and skill. Interchangeability of parts was finally achieved by combining a number of innovations and improvements in machining operations and machine tools, which were developed primarily for making textile machinery. The Arsenel at Springfield was a center of manufacturing, including interchangeable parts , during the War of , when US manufacturing increased due to the isolation of war.

The event that laid the groundwork for this monumental change was the introduction of interchangeable parts, or pre-manufactured parts that were for all practical purposes identical, into the firearms industry. Interchangeable parts, popularized in America when Eli Whitney used them to assemble muskets in the first years of the 19th century, allowed relatively unskilled workers to produce large numbers of weapons quickly and at lower cost, and made repair and replacement of parts infinitely easier. Gunmaking was considered an extremely skilled craft in the 18th century, and firearms, including pistols and muskets, were all constructed by hand. In this way, every gun was a one-of-a-kind possession, and a gun broken could not be easily repaired. At the very least, the process was time consuming and expensive, as the gun had to be brought to a craftsman and repaired to order. LeBlanc was not alone in imagining the potential value of this concept; an English naval engineer Samuel Bentham had earlier pioneered the use of uniform parts in the production of wooden pulleys for sailing ships.

1 thoughts on “Interchangeable Parts: Acting, Industry, and Technology in US Theater by Victor Holtcamp

  1. The event that laid the groundwork for this monumental change was the introduction of interchangeable parts, or pre-manufactured parts that.

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