Stations of the cross national gallery

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stations of the cross national gallery

Modernism From the National Gallery of Art: The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection by Harry Cooper

Over the course of fifty years, Robert and Jane Meyerhoff assembled an unparalleled collection of more than three hundred postwar paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. No less impressive is the Meyerhoffs gift of their entire holdings to the National Gallery of Art, Washington. Published on the occasion of a major exhibition at the de Young in San Francisco, Modernism from the National Gallery of Art: The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection features works by more than twenty-five of the periods finest artists, including Josef Albers, Hans Hofmann, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Rothko, and Frank Stella, as well as Barnett Newmans fifteen-canvas masterpiece, The Stations of the Cross: Lema Sabachthani.
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Published 26.09.2019

Stations of the Cross - Saint Faustina's Way of The Cross

According to the art critic Harold Rosenberg there is nothing religious about Barnett Newman’s series of fourteen roughly human-sized, black and white paintings, The Stations of the Cross: Lema Sabachtani. For Newman, The Stations were not merely about Jesus’ agony but attested.
Harry Cooper

National Gallery of Art - Barnett Newman - The Stations of the Cross - Lema Sabachthani

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Each stripe, in a sense, consists of multiple miniature crosses, and subtle stains throughout the paintings could stand in as blood, sweat or tears. Is it surprising that a Jewish artist like Newman would address Jewish subjects through reference to the Crucifixion? He is nailed to an enormous cross adorned by a Hebrew and Aramaic inscription that identifies him as the king of the Jews.
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How an abstract expressionist came to Jesus. By that year, Mark Rothko was producing his definitive work, including the series that would evolve into the Rothko Chapel, the culmination of his spiritual ambitions. And far from conquering nature, he suffered a reminder of his subservience to it that year when he had a heart attack. But that year was the moment in his development when Barnett Newman, quite literally, came to Jesus. For these paintings, begun in and finished in , the colorist gave up color. That decision alone might have struck his contemporaries as a repudiation of his earlier work, as Newman had until that point largely relied on the interaction of progressive and regressive colors across a vertical axis—a method he discovered.

Stations of the Cross uses new and existing artworks at 14 iconic locations to lead viewers on a 'pilgrimage' across central London, telling the story of Jesus' journey through Jerusalem to the Cross. The exhibition — which runs until Easter Monday — tells the story of the Passion in fresh ways. Information about all the stations — including an interactive map, podcasts and events — is available from the website: www. The launch event took place at the chapel of King's College London, attended by representatives from the various sites that are hosting the 14 stations. Organisers of the project felt that having this work at IHQ was particularly appropriate because of the assistance provided by The Salvation Army to refugees and other forgotten people around the world. Others poured their experiences into messages written on some of the clothes, from words of hope and peace to poignant messages such as 'Why did my son have to die? Once the work was finished, it was taken on a perilous, difficult journey over the River Thames and back across the Millennium Bridge to symbolise the loss and trauma suffered by refugees who are forced to leave their homes and travel long distances to seek safety and welcome.

Visit our Interactive Map. Carolyn Rosen to prompt your prayers or reflections. It challenges people wherever it is shown to greater awareness of the plight of victims. Transcending religious and cultural boundaries, it has become even more pertinent within a global culture of terrorism, suspicion of refugees, and racial and sexual discrimination. It has been installed in locations of past and present conflict, including Cape Town, commemorating the end of Apartheid, and Coventry and Dresden, destroyed in World War II.

1 thoughts on “Modernism From the National Gallery of Art: The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection by Harry Cooper

  1. Installation view of Barnett Newman's “The Stations of the Cross” () in the National Gallery of Art's East Building, Tower 1 galleries.

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