Avies dreams an afro feminist coloring book

5.73  ·  8,882 ratings  ·  789 reviews
avies dreams an afro feminist coloring book

Avies Dreams: An Afro-Feminist Coloring Book by Makeda Lewis

A young dreamer wanders through a personal mythology of women warriors, tropical flowers, and sea creatures. A radically introspective and interpersonal take on the usual coming-of-age tale, Avie firmly establishes her authorial role—and infuses ancient Greek lore, Renaissance scripts, and Hollywood blockbusters with images of afro-centricity and queer identity.

Despite the continued popularity of adult coloring books, few actually incorporate adult literary themes into their pages. Avies Dreams is beautifully illustrated, but also tells a complex and challenging narrative of race, gender and sexuality, and body image. Interspersed with lyrics and quotes taken from contemporary Internet culture and modern poetry, the story investigates the trials and magic of a young black girl growing up in the world.

Makeda Lewis is an artist living and making in Atlanta, GA. Her art has been positively reviewed by BET, Colorlines, Blavity, Madame Noire, The Reel Network, and Her Style Media. This is her first book.


File Name: avies dreams an afro feminist coloring book.zip
Size: 28966 Kb
Published 10.02.2019

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Avie's Dreams: An Afro-Feminist Coloring Book (Paperback)

It was raining when I met with Makeda Lewis. As we began to talk our conversation turned poetic and interesting, and the words on the pages of her book became embodied by the woman sitting across from me. Many of these project what I was feeling at the time I made the specific drawings -- empty, disgusted, powerful, scared of death -- these drawings are projections of those feelings in those moments. As I sipped my ginger tea and enjoyed listening to her, the conversation turned dark and existential for a few moments. We discussed death, and how many of the illustrations in her book can be seen as depressing because they focus on her own mortality. The idea of dying, death, no longer being here, leaving everyone and everything behind - it fucking terrifies me. The way she carries herself, her confidence and talent, everything about her.

The coloring book is filled with mythological illustrations of black women with symbolic quotes about gender identity, sexual expression, and black womanhood. This book is different from the Johanna Basford-esq coloring books filled with enchanted forests and secret gardens though those are cool too. As soon as I received my copy, I whipped out my colored pencils and went to work. Grab your coloring tools and enjoy. I carry so many colors in my skin, so much weight in my hips, infinite voices in my throat. How could I not love myself?

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Through personal dialogue and powerful words next to vivid images, an afro-feminist woman glows with confidence in identity and womanhood. Her bold statements inspire personal introspection and her thought-provoking questions unite us as we question the same ideas. Personal, historical, and floral illustrations show the resilience of women and their diverse representations over time. A young dreamer wanders through a personal mythology of women warriors, tropical flowers, and sea creatures. A radically introspective and interpersonal take on the usual coming-of-age tale, Avie firmly establishes her authorial role—and infuses ancient Greek lore, Renaissance scripts, and Hollywood blockbusters with images of afro-centricity and queer identity. You must log in to comment. Log in to get emails when Makeda Lewis Author has something new.

Makeda Lewis is a year-old artist from Atlanta, Georgia. Much of her work explores themes of self-love, body image, gender, and black womanhood. The project, which is both a self-love letter and an adult coloring book, features beautiful illustrations that mix nature and fantasy. A young dreamer wanders through a personal mythology of women warriors, tropical flowers, and sea creatures. A radically introspective and interpersonal take on the usual coming-of-age tale, Avie firmly establishes her authorial role—and infuses ancient Greek lore, Renaissance scripts, and Hollywood blockbusters with images of afro-centricity and queer identity.

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5 thoughts on “Avies Dreams: An Afro-Feminist Coloring Book by Makeda Lewis

  1. A young dreamer wanders through a personal mythology of women warriors, tropical flowers, and sea creatures.

  2. BGN Book Review: Avie’s Dreams: An Afro-Feminist Coloring Book | Black Girl Nerds

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