Thames from its source to the sea and back

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thames from its source to the sea and back

From Source to Sea by Tom Chesshyre

Over the years, authors, artists and amblers aplenty have felt the pull of the Thames, and now travel writer Tom Chesshyre is following in their footsteps. He’s walking the length of the river from the Cotswolds to the North Sea – a winding journey of over two hundred miles. Join him for an illuminating stroll past meadows, churches, palaces, country (and council) estates, factories and dockyards. Seeing some familiar sights through new eyes, and meeting a host of interesting characters along the way, Tom explores the living present and remarkable past of England’s longest and most iconic river.
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Published 08.01.2019

The Source of the River Thames

River Thames From Source to Sea.
Tom Chesshyre

Source to Sea River Relay

In the spring of the artist Stephan Kaluza and his team photographed both banks of the Thames from its source in the Cotswold Hills to its mouth in the North Sea. They went partly on foot and partly by boat and took pictures of each bank every few seconds, ending up with about 30, images. A selection of these was then digitally combined to form the consecutive sequences of the changing and varied riverscapes that are displayed in this book. Although the Thames and the city of London seem an inseparable entity, the river has a rich natural and historical identity of its own, revealed by this journey along it. The Thames flows through remote rural limestone villages and farms and the medieval city of Oxford, past boathouses and hundreds of small craft at their moorings, past the ends of the gardens of Henley and Marlow and through sprawling Reading.

View Larger Image. Ask Seller a Question. Title: Thames: From its source to the sea and back. Publisher: Thames and Hudson Ltd. In the spring of the artist Stephan Kaluza and his team photographed both banks of the Thames from its source in the in the Cotswold Hills to its mouth in the North Sea. They went partly on foot and partly by boat and took pictures of each bank every few seconds, ending up with about 30, images. A selection of these was then digitally combined to form the consecutive sequences of the varied riverscapes that are displayed in this book.

Buy Thames: From its source to the sea and back 01 by Stephan Kaluza, Peter Vansittart (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low.
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The Thames - From Source to Sea 2017

During June there was an overnight camping journey that required a sea kayak, the ability to limbo under fallen trees, step over them as your kayak floated underneath and hopefully step back in, or the stamina to carry your boat around fallen objects. Derek even showed us how to roll under a tree. The first part of the trip was quite challenging but after a few miles we were clear of the trees and shallows. The camping was very rudimentary and on the opposite side of the river to the pub, but the food and drink were good and the publican waived the camping charge. The first day had perfect weather with almost no wind and blue sky. The only issue was finding a pub to stop at so we could have a drink with lunch.

T he Thames is miles from source to sea, and for centuries writers of all kinds have been inspired by it, returning to its banks again and again to explore what it can tell us about memory, history and landscape. My introduction to this wealth of river writing began at the end: I grew up sailing on the Thames estuary — the muddy, sometimes smelly, coastal area downstream from London where the famous river finally joins the North Sea. My parents arrived here after sailing thousands of miles from South Africa in a boat they had built themselves. By the time I was born a few years later, the estuary had ceased to be just a point of entry for them. It was home.

5 thoughts on “From Source to Sea by Tom Chesshyre

  1. Now in its third year the Source to Sea River Relay is bigger and more diverse than ever.

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